Profession Workshops

Virtual Vancouver: NAVSA 2022 is hosting a series of six online Profession Seminars in advance of the "Unsettling Victorians" conference. Registration for these virtual workshops is free and open to all NAVSA members at any stage of the profession, from graduate students to in-career scholars. They will take place on February 26th and 27th, the weekend in advance of the regular conference programming. Some workshops will offer practical guidance and strategies, while others will open new and engaging conversations about the state of Victorian Studies. 

The events will happen over Zoom. Registration is through Eventbrite. Registration links  are included the event descriptions below.

Please direct questions to navsa2021@sfu.ca

Workshop Descriptions

Saturday February 26th

9:00-10:15am

Workshop Leaders: Pearl Chaozon Bauer (The Nueva School) and Sophia Hsu (Lehman College, CUNY)

Thriving in Academia as BIPOC will help BIPOC and other minoritized scholars capitalize on the current moment when diverse perspectives and expertise are recognized and respected in Victorian studies, particularly in relation to the fight against systemic racism and sexism that is reverberating around the country and the globe.  Possible topics include how to market the expertise that BIPOC and other minoritized scholars hold because of their lived experiences; how minoritized scholars can enliven learning and scholarly communities; and how white allies can better support minoritized colleagues through intentional collaboration.

Click here to register.

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10:30-11:45am

Workshop Leaders: Nathan Hensley (Georgetown University); Faith Wilson Stein (Northwestern UP, Senior Acquisitions Editor, scholarly); and Ronjaunee Chatterjee (Concordia University)

First-Book Publishing will take the form of a collaborative, participatory dialogue with a new author of a first book (Ronjaunee Chatterjee) and her editor (Faith Wilson Stein), with a focus on the movement from dissertation to monograph. Together we will discuss the relationship between these forms from the writer's point of view and the editor's; learn the nuts and bolts of the publishing process; and demystify what can often seem like strange new genres, from email introductions and conference pitches to proposals, reader reports, and more. Nathan K. Hensley will moderate.

Click here to register.

 

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12:00-1:15pm

Workshop Leaders: Rachel Ablow (SUNY Buffalo); Christopher Keep (Western University); Monique Morgan (Indiana University)

Journal Editors' Workshop will feature editors of major Victorian journals discussing publishing trends, new directions in Victorian Studies, the state of the field today and the challenges we currently face, and the kinds of essays they are looking for. They will also field questions about issues regarding the processes of publication in their respective journals.

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Sunday February 27th

9:00-10:15am

Workshop Leaders: Lisa Surridge (University of Victoria) and Mary Elizabeth Leighton (University of Victoria)

Top Ten Tips: How to Get Published in A Refereed Academic Journal

Topics will include journal selection, article topics, titles, introductions, prose style, showing your work, method, voice, tone, critical contribution.

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10:30-11:45am

Workshop Leaders: Sarah Weaver (Stanford University) and Kim O’Donnell (Simon Fraser University)

Non-Academic Work & Life

In this session, we will discuss working in non-academic positions in relation to academic expertise and skills. Sarah Weaver (Technical Editor, Palo Alto Networks and Program Manager, Stanford University) and Kim O’Donnell (Research Facilitator, Simon Fraser University) will offer some tips on finding resources and gaining skills during the PhD and then translating academic and graduate training skills to non-academic positions. We will also discuss what participants might want to consider—both professionally and personally—when deciding what kind of work to pursue in the current academic landscape.

Click here to register.

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12:00-1:15pm

Workshop Leaders: Priti Joshi (University of Puget Sound); Bassam Sidiki (University of Michigan); Kyle McAuley (Seton Hall University); Nasser Mufti (University of Illinois, Chicago)

The Victorian is a Career; or the State of the Field 
This workshop will focus on the conception(s) of our field in graduate programs, hiring, journals, and scholarly publications, and the gap – perceived or actual – between those institutional locations. To that end this is less a “to-do” session than a conversation about the “state of Victorian studies” and invites equally the voices of graduate students and early-career scholars, veteran faculty, field examiners, chairs, etc. (Our panel co-leaders represent this range as well). How have the borders of  “Victorian Studies” altered in the last quarter century? Can they  stretch further? Is such stretch desirable or appropriative? How is the stretch represented in exam lists, dissertations, job postings? What is accepted (and reproduced) in scholarly journals and other publication venues, what in classrooms? How might graduate students and young scholars manage these changes? What might senior scholars do to torque the field more towards young scholars?

Click here to register.